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Wooden Moby Dick - Pequod Model Whaling Boat 24
Wooden Moby Dick - Pequod Model Whaling Boat 24
Wooden Moby Dick - Pequod Model Whaling Boat 24
Wooden Moby Dick - Pequod Model Whaling Boat 24
Wooden Moby Dick - Pequod Model Whaling Boat 24
Wooden Moby Dick - Pequod Model Whaling Boat 24
Wooden Moby Dick - Pequod Model Whaling Boat 24
Wooden Moby Dick - Pequod Model Whaling Boat 24
Wooden Moby Dick - Pequod Model Whaling Boat 24

Wooden Moby Dick - Pequod Model Whaling Boat 24

Regular price
$320.00
Sale price
$255.91
Shipping calculated at checkout.

Wooden Moby Dick - Pequod Model Whaling Boat 24

Product ID: 9285    Item ID: pequod-24    Weight: 4 LB     Box Dimensions: 28" x 9" x 22" (L x W x H)

(This model ships in 1-2 weeks)

IMPORTANT MESSAGE ABOUT THIS PRODUCT

While we usually ship this product within 3-5 days, there has been a fire at the warehouse that holds this specific item. We are thankful no one was hurt but this is causing a delay in shipping some items which includes this specific item. As of today we will not be able to ship until after Thanksgiving while we go through the clean up process. We sincerely apologize for this but assure you that we are doing everything possible to speed up that process and will update you if we can ship sooner than the target date. We are grateful for your support and will continue to provide you with updates and hopefully tracking even sooner than we have planned for. THANK YOU in advance for your patience and continued support.

“ INTERNATIONAL ORDERS. Shipping costs for all International orders are estimated. We charge a minimum of $60.00 for international orders and we will send you a quote upon receiving your order if the cost is higher. In the event that the shipping costs are higher we will additionally invoice you once you have approved the quote. We are NOT responsible for any additional fees that may be incurred by Customs at destination. We urge you to check with your local postal service in your respective country. In the event you do not claim your merchandise and it is returned you will be responsible for the shipping costs and restocking fees and any additional fees incurred while the merchandise gets returned. Please do provide us with a good phone number when you place your order in order to include it in the shipping documents.

Finely-crafted details and museum-quality features define this replica tall ship model of the Pequod. Devoted attention to historical accuracy ensures that every detail on Pequod matches the tall ship made famous by the book Moby Dick. As the centerpiece of a den, office or meeting room, or perhaps setting a nautical tone for a family living room or corporate boardroom, this tall model ship is certain to inspire with her indomitable spirit and history.

24" Long x 4" Wide x 18" High (1:56 Scale)

High quality woods include cherry, birch, maple and rosewood
Handsewn white cloth sails
Arrives fully assembled with all sails mounted
Metal nameplate on wooden base identifies the ship as the Pequod
Built from scratch by master artisans
Meticulous painting accurately matches the actual Pequod
Extensive research of our tall ship models from original plans, historical drawings, and paintings, as well as actual photographs, ensures the highest possible accuracy
Amazing details include:
Handcrafted accessories such as detailed whale boats, metal ship wheel, and stove to really make the boat come alive
Detailed handsewn cloth sails
Pequod name plate placed on the stern of the ship
Rudder chains

In the 1840s, a Quaker whaling merchant named Charles W. Morgan ordered a whaleship from the shipbuilders Jethro and Zachariah Hillman of New Bedford, Massachusetts.

The hull and deck of Morgan reflected the industry which she was built to serve. A typical whaleship has three functions:

to serve as a mother ship to a fleet of small whaleboats, which are stored on the davits when not in use,
to serve as a factory and a refinery ship with tryworks for extracting oil from the whale blubber,
to serve as oil tankers.
Morgan\\\'s maiden voyage began on September 6, 1841. She sailed around Cape Horn and cruised the Pacific Ocean. Following Morgan\\\'s three year and four month voyage, she came home with 2,400 barrels of whale oil and 10,000 lbs of whalebone, known as baleen, which was worth around USD$56,000.

Later Service

In her 80 years of service, she would make 37 voyages ranging in length from nine months to five years. Charles W. Morgan, in total, brought home 54,483 barrels of whale oil and 152,934 pounds of whalebone. She sailed in the Indian and South Atlantic Oceans, surviving ice and snow storms. Her crew survived a cannibal attack in the South Pacific. Between 1888 and 1904 she was based in San Francisco.

Morgan had more than 1,000 whalemen of all races and nationalities in her lifetime. Her crew included not only Americans, but sailors from Cape Verde, New Zealand, the Seychelles, Guadeloupe, and Norfolk Island. The ship\\\'s crew averaged around 33 men per voyage. As with other whaleships in the 1800s, Morgan often was home to the captain\\\'s family.

Charles W. Morgan was used in 3 movies: the 1916 movie Miss Petticoats, the 1922 Down to the Sea in Ships, and in the 1930s in Java Head.

On the night of June 30, 1924, the Charles W. Morgan caught fire when the flaming wreck of the steamer Sankaty, which had drifted across the Achushnet River from New Bedford harbor in flames, collided with it. Badly charred, Morgan narrowly escaped destruction.

Retirement
The whaling days came to an end with the perfection of refining petroleum. Morgan was under the care of Whaling Enshrined, Inc. until 1941, when she was transferred to Mystic Seaport, where she still stands to this day.


Restoration
The Charles W. Morgan arrived at Mystic Seaport in December of 1941, narrowly avoiding destruction during WWII. A major restoration and preservation project was begun in 1968. In 1977 Morgan was designated a National Historic Landmark. Mystic Seaport is completing a multi-million dollar shipyard upgrade to accommodate the next phase of Morgan\\\'s restoration. She is the oldest whaler and commercial vessel surviving in America.

The United States Postal Service issued a commerorative stamp honoring the Charles W. Morgan.